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-   -   How can I go about repairing this rust? (http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=209104)

AmTeC 04-03-2017 07:38 PM

How can I go about repairing this rust?
 
So I have a bit of rust towards the back of the car around both the left and right wheel wells, the right side is particularly bad. How bad does it look? serious or not so much yet? How can I go about repairing this appropriately?https://images.discordapp.net/.eJwNy...832&height=468

AmTeC 04-03-2017 07:40 PM

Also there is rust around the square holes where the sash trim goes, and I would like to fix that before putting the trim on, and I'm really confused on how to tackle that. As for the sash trim itself, I have no idea how to put it back on, but I shall make a separate thread for that

GhostAccord 04-03-2017 08:25 PM

That is going to require you to cut out and replace that lower quarter panel. Shitty thing is you won't know exactly what needs to be replaced until you get that outer body panel cut off. Then and only then will you know if you need to also replace parts of the inner wheel well and the inner and outer rocker panels as well. That looks as though it is rusted from the inside out...... Not bad if you have a welder and some sheet metal fab skills.

Or you can do what 90% of the shade tree DIY'ers do. Grind it down to bare metal and Swiss cheese. Then fill it with spray foam and bondo then cover it with paint.

What is your budget and how much of this are you willing to do yourself?

Gotta hate Canadian Winters!

AmTeC 04-03-2017 08:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GhostAccord (Post 3268434)
That is going to require you to cut out and replace that lower quarter panel. Shitty thing is you won't know exactly what needs to be replaced until you get that outer body panel cut off. Then and only then will you know if you need to also replace parts of the inner wheel well and the inner and outer rocker panels as well. That looks as though it is rusted from the inside out...... Not bad if you have a welder and some sheet metal fab skills.

Or you can do what 90% of the shade tree DIY'ers do. Grind it down to bare metal and Swiss cheese. Then fill it with spray foam and bondo then cover it with paint.

What is your budget and how much of this are you willing to do yourself?

Gotta hate Canadian Winters!

Yikes, that sounds alot worse than I was hoping. My budget is pretty low unfortunately, And my welder is an unreliable homemade piece of crap so I wouldnt trust that on my car.
How well do the shady diy bondo repairs hold up? I want it to not rust again, or at least not for a very long time. I may have to bite the bullet and save up and get it fixed professionally :(

fleetw00d 04-03-2017 10:25 PM

This is sort of worst case on a sedan; less damage can be repaired with smaller patch panels. The process would be similar for a coupe: http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=180806

AmTeC 04-03-2017 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fleetw00d (Post 3268440)
This is sort of worst case on a sedan; less damage can be repaired with smaller patch panels. The process would be similar for a coupe: http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=180806

Yikes, and I thought Daisy's rust was bad. You did a great job restoring Ruby. I've seen
a cb7 even more rusted out than yours, unfortunately the owner doesn't have the money to fix it. I hate rust, Its like cancer for cars, just keeps spreading and getting worse.

AmTeC 04-03-2017 11:13 PM

More pictures of the rust
 
So heres pictures of the other rusty parts of the car. Lets say I end up having to bite the bullet and get it done professionally? how much do you think this would end up costing me?

https://images.discordapp.net/.eJwNy...832&height=468 https://images.discordapp.net/.eJwNy...832&height=468 https://images.discordapp.net/.eJwNy...832&height=468 https://images.discordapp.net/.eJwNy...832&height=468

Jarrett 04-04-2017 12:56 AM

At some point, if the car is just a utilitarian tool for you, the cost-benefit break-even point is eclipsed and it no longer makes sense to repair.

If you just want to drive the car around worry-free, but you're not really attached to the car, just leave it alone and drive it until it buckles when the door is shut.

If you don't care much the car, but really want something safer to drive, buy a new car. This option would be accepting that any car is going to suffer the same fate.

If you're somewhat attached to the car, still don't worry about fixing it as it's not worth the time and money to do it improperly.

If you're really attached to the car, then I suggest nothing short of a full repair with new or donor quarters. You can find a non-running car down South for under $500 and get it shipped to you for around $1000. That's expensive, but it's the only way to get everything. Plus, you'd have lots of spares.

AmTeC 04-04-2017 01:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarrett (Post 3268456)
At some point, if the car is just a utilitarian tool for you, the cost-benefit break-even point is eclipsed and it no longer makes sense to repair.

If you just want to drive the car around worry-free, but you're not really attached to the car, just leave it alone and drive it until it buckles when the door is shut.

If you don't care much the car, but really want something safer to drive, buy a new car. This option would be accepting that any car is going to suffer the same fate.

If you're somewhat attached to the car, still don't worry about fixing it as it's not worth the time and money to do it improperly.

If you're really attached to the car, then I suggest nothing short of a full repair with new or donor quarters. You can find a non-running car down South for under $500 and get it shipped to you for around $1000. That's expensive, but it's the only way to get everything. Plus, you'd have lots of spares.

I am very attached to this car, I bought it because the rust didnt seem too bad at first, seemed like quite the deal for $400. Its been very good to me so far, I bought a cb7 because it feels similar to my old EF sedan which was killed doing burnouts (Wasn't me). A cb7 is better! bigger with more power and twice as reliable , as the past 5 months rolled by, more chunks of paint fell off revealing the real damage. I guess I'll just try my best to try to slow down and hide the rust. I'll ask the body shop down the road for an estimate, if it seems reasonable I'll go for it. The rust will probably come back but better than leaving it open I suppose. Regular washing and waxing should keep the rust at bay for a while. I would love to have the job done properly by getting replacement panels and whatnot, but I don't have the space to keep all the parts, let alone an entire extra car :(

kseriescivic 04-04-2017 02:22 AM

I had rust repair done between the rear windshield and trunk. Cost me 500$ and is the only rust i've found so far. Yours looks a lot worse... I plan on keeping my car forever so I bit the bullet and had it fixed properly.

If your going to spend money on fixing the rust than do it right the first time and be done with it. Also, dont just go to any body shop for this. The only estimate you should get is to have everything fixed properly. If not your just buying a really expensive bandaid and wasting money. Good luck and hope everything works out for you.

GTRON 04-04-2017 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jarrett (Post 3268456)
At some point, if the car is just a utilitarian tool for you, the cost-benefit break-even point is eclipsed and it no longer makes sense to repair.

If you just want to drive the car around worry-free, but you're not really attached to the car, just leave it alone and drive it until it buckles when the door is shut.

If you don't care much the car, but really want something safer to drive, buy a new car. This option would be accepting that any car is going to suffer the same fate.

If you're somewhat attached to the car, still don't worry about fixing it as it's not worth the time and money to do it improperly.

If you're really attached to the car, then I suggest nothing short of a full repair with new or donor quarters. You can find a non-running car down South for under $500 and get it shipped to you for around $1000. That's expensive, but it's the only way to get everything. Plus, you'd have lots of spares.

^That's depressing LOL. Jarrett, If the car's not worth putting thousands of dollars into for a shop to do it, why not try the $100 fix and at least make it look decent?

You can check out the thread I recently started with the exact same question: http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=208946.

I am right in the middle of repairing rust right now on my car, with fiber-glass. Most people will be like "the rust is going to come back, no matter what" (so on and so forth) if you don't weld in sheet metal. But if you do everything right (grinding out all of the rust, priming/undercoating everything), and prep properly, I don't see rust coming back very soon.
It does take a lot time to do though, but the best part is it's going to cost like $60 for me to do it to my car LOL.

Regarding doing it "the right way", people weld in sheet metal all the time (doing it right) just to have rust re-appear a year or two later. It almost makes sense to replace the metal with something that doesn't rust, haha. But this also shows it's all about the prep work.

Here's what I'm in the middle of right now (also doing a rear disc swap hehe).
http://i63.tinypic.com/2sah10g.jpg
you can see before pics on that thread I gave you a link to

AmTeC 04-04-2017 06:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GTRON (Post 3268461)
^That's depressing LOL. Jarrett, If the car's not worth putting thousands of dollars into for a shop to do it, why not try the $100 fix and at least make it look decent?

You can check out the thread I recently started with the exact same question: http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=208946.

I am right in the middle of repairing rust right now on my car, with fiber-glass. Most people will be like "the rust is going to come back, no matter what" (so on and so forth) if you don't weld in sheet metal. But if you do everything right (grinding out all of the rust, priming/undercoating everything), and prep properly, I don't see rust coming back very soon.
It does take a lot time to do though, but the best part is it's going to cost like $60 for me to do it to my car LOL.

Regarding doing it "the right way", people weld in sheet metal all the time (doing it right) just to have rust re-appear a year or two later. It almost makes sense to replace the metal with something that doesn't rust, haha. But this also shows it's all about the prep work.

Here's what I'm in the middle of right now (also doing a rear disc swap hehe).
http://i63.tinypic.com/2sah10g.jpg
you can see before pics on that thread I gave you a link to

hmm, fiberglass you say. What's the process of fixing rust holes with fiberglass? By fiberglass do you mean fiberglass body filler/tiger hair?

GTRON 04-04-2017 07:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AmTeC (Post 3268472)
hmm, fiberglass you say. What's the process of fixing rust holes with fiberglass? By fiberglass do you mean fiberglass body filler/tiger hair?

In my case I am using Bondo "Resin Jelly" and Fiberglass cloth to build the strength, and then regular Bondo body filler to do final shaping. I don't have any concerns about strength. This Resin Jelly stuff by it's self is really stout, the fabric is more for shaping it out easier. :)

I did buy "tiger hair", but I'm just going to stick with using just the resin jelly and fabric. :tu:

Let me know if you have anymore questions, I'm in the middle of doing all this right now haha.

GTRON 04-04-2017 07:33 PM

Also, check this guys thread out, he did fiberglass too.
http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=149002

deevergote 04-05-2017 03:25 PM

Jarrett's idea of getting a donor car shipped to you is a good one. That would truly be the best way to go about getting everything you need. Parting out the car will allow you to recoup a fair amount of the expense, if not all of it. Do it right, and that method would be cheaper than getting lower-quality aftermarket replacement panels. It'll just take longer and require more work.

I wouldn't trust the repair to anyone but a highly skilled body repair person. Done improperly, the rust will return along the weld points (I had that happen myself.) If the car means something to you and you want it fixed properly, a quality repair professional is worth every penny.
Just keep in mind that time is your enemy here. The rust will continue to spread. My friend had rear quarter panel rust on his CB7. He wanted to repair it, but he put it off for "just one more winter". The rust spread up and under his rear window, inflating his repair bill to over $4000. The work was definitely worth it, and it looked beautiful when complete... but he had probably exceeded the value of his car (by about double) in that repair! If you're going to do it right, it's going to cost... and you'll NEVER see that money again. Granted, it's the only way to have your car properly and reliably repaired... and that's worth more than the car's blue book value.

GTRON's suggestion isn't a bad one. A temporary fix that makes the car look better is a good alternative to just letting it rot away. It will likely continue to rot under the temporary repair, but at least you won't have to watch it happen. If you decide that a proper professional repair isn't worth the cost, then I'd probably go with that method.
Just don't do a band-aid repair with the expectation of getting it fixed properly in the future... because the chances of the proper fix costing a lot more then (like with my friend's car) are very likely.

AmTeC 04-05-2017 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deevergote (Post 3268511)
Jarrett's idea of getting a donor car shipped to you is a good one. That would truly be the best way to go about getting everything you need. Parting out the car will allow you to recoup a fair amount of the expense, if not all of it. Do it right, and that method would be cheaper than getting lower-quality aftermarket replacement panels. It'll just take longer and require more work.

I wouldn't trust the repair to anyone but a highly skilled body repair person. Done improperly, the rust will return along the weld points (I had that happen myself.) If the car means something to you and you want it fixed properly, a quality repair professional is worth every penny.
Just keep in mind that time is your enemy here. The rust will continue to spread. My friend had rear quarter panel rust on his CB7. He wanted to repair it, but he put it off for "just one more winter". The rust spread up and under his rear window, inflating his repair bill to over $4000. The work was definitely worth it, and it looked beautiful when complete... but he had probably exceeded the value of his car (by about double) in that repair! If you're going to do it right, it's going to cost... and you'll NEVER see that money again. Granted, it's the only way to have your car properly and reliably repaired... and that's worth more than the car's blue book value.

GTRON's suggestion isn't a bad one. A temporary fix that makes the car look better is a good alternative to just letting it rot away. It will likely continue to rot under the temporary repair, but at least you won't have to watch it happen. If you decide that a proper professional repair isn't worth the cost, then I'd probably go with that method.
Just don't do a band-aid repair with the expectation of getting it fixed properly in the future... because the chances of the proper fix costing a lot more then (like with my friend's car) are very likely.

Yeah I certainly made the mistake of letting it sit for "just one more winter" to the point where theres a visible hole beside my tail light. I really love this car, Seems that I might have to go the bandaid route until the day the car is done for. I would love to buy more panels but I can't weld very well.

on another note, I sent these pics to a local autobody repair shop, The guy said the estimate is about $500-$600 and the rust is guranteed not to come back for 10 years. Seems kinda sketchy to me, what do you guys think? I asked what the process is and he didnt reply yet which is odd.

deevergote 04-05-2017 09:04 PM

Probably just a welded patch, which is more likely to fail. Still, with the warranty, it's not bad. As long as the warranty means returning the car to fully repaired condition. If you have to pay to repaint when they fix the metal again, it's not a great deal.

AmTeC 04-05-2017 09:27 PM

Another thing I was wondering, If you grind all the rust away, and body filler it, and prime & paint it, wouldn't that seal it off and stop the rust? Where does it come back from if its been ground off to bare shiny metal and sealed?

AmTeC 04-05-2017 09:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deevergote (Post 3268521)
Probably just a welded patch, which is more likely to fail. Still, with the warranty, it's not bad. As long as the warranty means returning the car to fully repaired condition. If you have to pay to repaint when they fix the metal again, it's not a great deal.

He got back to me, 5 year warranty, and He said either new panels can be welded in, or fiberglass patches can be used, then he asked me what I prefer. So whaddya think? worth it or nah?

deevergote 04-05-2017 09:56 PM

Is painting included in that price? Both the initial job and if he ever has to redo it under warranty?


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