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Old 01-24-2018, 11:05 PM   #1
Jarrett
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ENG : Installing Collector Studs Into Cheap Stainless Headers

Alright, this work was not done on my CB, nor the J-series that was built for the Accord, but it is directly applicable to the aftermarket headers that many of us get for the F22As and H22As these cars are usually running.

When you buy most low-end to mid-level aftermarket tubular headers they will come with a flanged union between the upper section of the manifold and the lower collector pipe. In the case of the F22A and H22A, this is most commonly the point where the header merges from 4 pipes to 2. In the case of this J32A2 I'm reinstalling headers on, it's at the 3-1 merge. The flanges will have holes on both sides that you will have to line up before using standard bolts, washers and nuts in order to mate them. This can be a problem when you're having to use one hand to hold the bolt down, one hand to hold the collector pipe flange up against the manifold flange, and another hand to start the threads on the nut from the bottom. If you can get a friend to help, you're certainly better off, but what if that person can't get a tool on the top nut to hold it in place for torquing? The twists of the primary pipes aren't usually conducive to easy access. The OEM manifolds provide us with an easy solution in that the "bolts" are actually studs that are fixed to the upper manifold. This solution will show you how to replicate that process on your header or headers that have the same style of flange.











First, you'll need to establish the thread size you'll need. Finding M10 lug studs can be very difficult, so I went up to an M12x1.25 at 39mm long. For the 4-cylinder application, you'll need 3 of them. You'll also need 3 M12x1.25 flanged nuts. Flanged nuts will eliminate the need for washers. Avoid nylon locking washers for this application, as they are subject to very high heat levels.





Since I went up in size, I had to drill out the holes to allow for the larger studs. You can step up in bit sizes gradually, checking the fitment of the lug stud along the way, or you can get a dial caliper and measure the diameter of the stud at the splined section. If you choose that method, drill up to a bit size just under that diameter.

Once you've drilled the holes to the proper size, test fit the lug studs in their holes facing downward. If you're sure you have the right size hole, pull the stud out and sand the flange flat to remove any burrs caused by drilling.





Due to the angle the pipes come into the flange, you may have to clearance the heads on some of the studs in order to clear. Out of the 6 studs in my application, I had to grind the heads on 4 of them.














Now you're ready to stack washers and zip a nut onto the threads. My flanged nuts haven't arrived yet, so I used a nut from the nut pile. This one happens to be from the rear lower control arm through-bolt.





Now just zip it down with an impact until the socket stops spinning. Have someone hold the manifold, or put it in a vise.

And there you have it, folks! To finish the job, you'll need to drill accompanying holes on the collector pipe's flange in order to accommodate the larger diameter studs, if you chose to go up in size. Otherwise, it's ready to install and you've eliminated the need for a third hand!




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Old 01-25-2018, 10:47 AM   #2
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super useful idea for those with two-piece exhaust manifolds/headers.
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Old 01-25-2018, 07:38 PM   #3
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Perfect! Man I can't believe I didn't think of this.

Awesome diy. Thanks!
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Old 01-25-2018, 11:26 PM   #4
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Jarrett thats freaking genius! Be liberal with the antiseeze
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Old 01-26-2018, 03:46 PM   #5
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Could you have tapped the flange and installed a stud similar to the studs in the OEM manifold? The downside is similar though, I've had the studs back out occasionally when trying to remove the nuts. Same thing with the studs in the head for the exhaust manifold.
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Old 01-26-2018, 04:47 PM   #6
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You could have, and then just weld the exposed end of the stud to the backside of the flange. I originally purchased new hardware to essentially weld the bolts in place. But, as I'm living with the fiancees's parents while house shopping here in Houston, I don't have 220V in the garage for my welder here. The method I chose was a product of trying specifically to avoid welding. After doing it, I may even prefer that method. If it ever strips, I can hammer it out and zip a new one in its place.
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Old 02-06-2018, 03:27 PM   #7
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This is genius! It would've saved my ass so many times!
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Old 02-06-2018, 08:05 PM   #8
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Why not just keep the double sided studs and put a nut on top the too lock it into place? You avoid having to grind anything down, it was a lot less work.
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