CB7Tuner Forums

Go Back   CB7Tuner Forums > 4th Gen-eral > Off Topic

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 07-22-2015, 07:42 PM   #21
gloryaccordy
Contributing Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: The doomship!
Posts: 8,468
gloryaccordy seems to have made some friends!
Damn Deev.... if you can get some IT certs you should totally go that route. You can also make your own projects to display your competence without actually working. And it's a field that takes any and everybody as long as you can get work done. The fact that you can talk to people is a mega bonus.

I still think you can spin your experience as something positive. You worked for yourself. Has your annual revenue grown? You can speak to that. There have to be some universal skills you picked up from your job. Are you good with Microsoft Office? What software do you use? Recruiters jump on buzzwords. If you havent already I would look at sample resumes of independent contractors. The skills required to run a business def translate to working in a business.
__________________


Quote:
Originally Posted by lordoja View Post
im with you on that one bro! aint nothing beat free food and drinks any day of the week, even if its at a funeral
gloryaccordy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2015, 08:35 PM   #22
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
I've hyped my skills as best I could on my resume. Microsoft Office experience, invoicing, bookkeeping... I even put database management skills on there as a result of this forum (even though most of my database management skills have involved me breaking something and running to Pandemic for help...) While I'm sure I could get SOMETHING, I'm not sure what that would get me. I feel having an MBA (while earning experience doing something "business related") will set me apart in the workplace.
The bad thing about my business is that it was in the shadows. It was hard enough to explain to people exactly what I did, let alone what skills I gained from it! I had no storefront, no registered company name, no EIN, no business license... my clients would likely deny knowing who I am if contacted. We didn't even have an official contract. Total deniability was key... and it basically meant that I was a ghost. The only thing I have is a bogus website that I created a few months ago in an attempt to provide a legitimate business presence for my mortgage company, so they would let me refinance (apparently my federal tax return documents weren't good enough!) www.deverinvestigations.com

IT certs are a good idea. I've been studying SQL over the past few days. LOTS of job listings I've seen are looking for people with SQL experience in one form or another.

That's a good idea to look at sample resumes for independent contractors. I hadn't thought of that.
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2015, 08:57 PM   #23
gloryaccordy
Contributing Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: The doomship!
Posts: 8,468
gloryaccordy seems to have made some friends!
Whatever you do best of luck man. And congrats!!!
__________________


Quote:
Originally Posted by lordoja View Post
im with you on that one bro! aint nothing beat free food and drinks any day of the week, even if its at a funeral
gloryaccordy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2015, 11:15 AM   #24
GeoffM
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Clarkston, MI
Posts: 2,262
GeoffM seems to have made some friends! GeoffM seems to have made some friends!
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevergote View Post
IT certs are a good idea. I've been studying SQL over the past few days. LOTS of job listings I've seen are looking for people with SQL experience in one form or another.
If you've got the required CPU horsepower try standing up a SQL server of your own and run some scripts and dummy data on it. Very helpful in understanding more of the concepts.
__________________
MRT
37.5 MPG, AC on, cruising at 80.
30.0 MPG, AC on, aggressively driving around 90.
27.5 MPG, no AC, cruising at 90 with occasional gridlock. 40 degrees Fahrenheit

Lots of DIY videos specifically for our car

Get some awesome wipers! <-- It's a DIY
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tippey764 View Post
I think driving your car naked will cause the engine to overheat
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevergote View Post
sneaky motherfucker
GeoffM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 01:11 PM   #25
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
Yeah, that's what I'm hoping to be able to do. I've downloaded a few programs, but I'm not at the point of understanding how to use them just yet. I haven't studied since Thursday...so I need to get back into it! (getting engaged and being taken out every night by family or friends has kept me busy!)
I'm plowing through SQL For Dummies right now. So far, it's a lot of simple stuff that I don't know how to implement, a lot of confusing stuff that the author promises he'll explain later, and at the moment, it's a tutorial on using Microsoft Access (which I have, so I might as well start there!)



Also, on a funny note... I just got a thing in the mail from Rutgers trying to sell me on an MBA I'd actually consider going back to Rutgers, over the cheaper online option... but Rutgers would end up being like $45,000.

Guys on degreeinfo.com are all trying to persuade me NOT to go for the MBA, which is disheartening. s2cmpugh's experience is keeping me focused, though. That's essentially what my goal is... whereas most people that say "I'm getting an MBA!" expect to make 6 figures right off the bat. I'll be happy with $50,000, and the potential to gain experience that will make me worth more in time. Not getting my degree from a locally-recognized school might hurt me a bit, but I'm hoping not too much.
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 06:43 PM   #26
owequitit
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern AZ
Posts: 7,645
owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful
Send a message via AIM to owequitit
Biggest issue with a Master's is to make sure it actually applies to what you want. There is a bit of the "I have a degree" halo effect, but the Master's is much more designed to make you a subject matter expert, so it will be much more applicable if it is in your field of study/practice. That is what I was alluding to earlier.

Master's are much more beneficial if they apply to your career track.
owequitit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 07:56 PM   #27
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
True. And it pretty much IS relevant to the field(s) that I'm entering. An MBA is a Master's in business... and pretty much EVERYTHING is "business". In my area right now, there are a very wide variety of jobs looking for MBA grads... from a research position at Rutgers University, to positions in numerous pharmaceutical companies (sales and marketing, mainly), to analyst positions for a number of companies in various fields (technology, accounting, retail, consulting firms...)


To be honest, I'm not really expecting an MBA to get me much more than a Bachelor's degree in business would right off the bat. I have little experience in any particular field, so I'll likely be starting at a lower level. It will allow for more rapid advancement, however. Not to mention it is also far cheaper and faster than getting a Bachelor's in business, believe it or not!
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 08:58 PM   #28
owequitit
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern AZ
Posts: 7,645
owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful
Send a message via AIM to owequitit
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevergote View Post
True. And it pretty much IS relevant to the field(s) that I'm entering. An MBA is a Master's in business... and pretty much EVERYTHING is "business". In my area right now, there are a very wide variety of jobs looking for MBA grads... from a research position at Rutgers University, to positions in numerous pharmaceutical companies (sales and marketing, mainly), to analyst positions for a number of companies in various fields (technology, accounting, retail, consulting firms...)


To be honest, I'm not really expecting an MBA to get me much more than a Bachelor's degree in business would right off the bat. I have little experience in any particular field, so I'll likely be starting at a lower level. It will allow for more rapid advancement, however. Not to mention it is also far cheaper and faster than getting a Bachelor's in business, believe it or not!
Yes, I am aware of the MBA... But with a generalized Master's you have to be careful. As long as it plays into your career plans and you properly utilize it, it is a good investment. It is just one of those degrees that a lot of people get and then it really doesn't do anything. I may very well go back and get an MBA as my next Master's, but I know what I want to do with it (not saying you don't).
owequitit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 09:14 PM   #29
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
To me, it seems like the best step. It's general, but in many ways that's the point. I'm specializing in "strategic leadership", which should point me in the management and/or consulting direction that I hope to go, but it's still rather general (the various programs are all fairly similar.)
The main thing is that I don't really know what I want to be when I grow up. You've been working toward being a pilot for as long as I've known you, and if you ever go in a direction other than flying, I'm pretty sure you'd stay within the general realm of airplanes and air travel.
I've spent far too long trying to figure out what I want to do. At this point, I just want a job that will pay well, offer advancement opportunities and valuable experience, and not be all-consuming in terms of time or energy. I picked the MBA after browsing want ads and finding a plethora of jobs that sound like they may be interesting, that offer attractive pay and reasonable hours... and many had various stages of a certain position (Analyst I, Analyst II, Analyst III, for example...) with drastically increasing pay ranges... which showed opportunity for advancement.
Most of the jobs that looked attractive to me looked for a Bachelor's in business, or an MBA. I figure an MBA would qualify me for those jobs looking for a lesser business degree. At least enough to check that box, if nothing else.
Seeing as I have little directly marketable experience, and my current degrees are pretty useless in a job search, I figure an MBA would be the fastest and easiest way into a desirable job. In the meantime, I may need to take some crap office job... but hey, office experience (even at $10/hr) will be more valuable than what I have to offer now!

At the moment, I'm working with 9 years of self-employment. Worse, I have no store front, no business name (aside from my BS website, deverinvestigations.com), and my only client for years just went belly-up... so, essentially, I have NO proof aside from my word to support the claims on my resume. To a prospective employer, that may as well say I've been unemployed for 9 years. A BA in psychology and an AS in business aren't of much greater value, sadly. An MBA is marketable... and for the relatively small investment of $12,000-$15,000 and 2 years of my time, I think it's going to be worth it. At the very least, I'll learn some useful skills.
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 09:47 PM   #30
owequitit
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern AZ
Posts: 7,645
owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful
Send a message via AIM to owequitit
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevergote View Post
To me, it seems like the best step. It's general, but in many ways that's the point. I'm specializing in "strategic leadership", which should point me in the management and/or consulting direction that I hope to go, but it's still rather general (the various programs are all fairly similar.)
The main thing is that I don't really know what I want to be when I grow up. You've been working toward being a pilot for as long as I've known you, and if you ever go in a direction other than flying, I'm pretty sure you'd stay within the general realm of airplanes and air travel.
I've spent far too long trying to figure out what I want to do. At this point, I just want a job that will pay well, offer advancement opportunities and valuable experience, and not be all-consuming in terms of time or energy. I picked the MBA after browsing want ads and finding a plethora of jobs that sound like they may be interesting, that offer attractive pay and reasonable hours... and many had various stages of a certain position (Analyst I, Analyst II, Analyst III, for example...) with drastically increasing pay ranges... which showed opportunity for advancement.
Most of the jobs that looked attractive to me looked for a Bachelor's in business, or an MBA. I figure an MBA would qualify me for those jobs looking for a lesser business degree. At least enough to check that box, if nothing else.
Seeing as I have little directly marketable experience, and my current degrees are pretty useless in a job search, I figure an MBA would be the fastest and easiest way into a desirable job. In the meantime, I may need to take some crap office job... but hey, office experience (even at $10/hr) will be more valuable than what I have to offer now!

At the moment, I'm working with 9 years of self-employment. Worse, I have no store front, no business name (aside from my BS website, deverinvestigations.com), and my only client for years just went belly-up... so, essentially, I have NO proof aside from my word to support the claims on my resume. To a prospective employer, that may as well say I've been unemployed for 9 years. A BA in psychology and an AS in business aren't of much greater value, sadly. An MBA is marketable... and for the relatively small investment of $12,000-$15,000 and 2 years of my time, I think it's going to be worth it. At the very least, I'll learn some useful skills.
True. You aren't completely in the dark with your last job either. You have tax records, which makes it legit. There might not be anybody to contact about your employment history, but that isn't the end of the world either as such things happen all the time.

I would also agree that an MBA would definitely qualify you for the jobs requiring a lesser degree. As for me, I specifically would like finance. However, one of the things I like about the Safety Master's is that it allows me to work pretty much anywhere in any industry. Of course, my thought behind that is not just a backup plan for my hobby, but also that I could theoretically start to consult with it and write my own tickets.

I don't think its necessarily a bad thing that you don't know what you want either. The downside to my position is that I pursued through hell and back only to find out it wasn't what I thought it was. Not to say its bad, but the reality is FAR different than the dream of the reality.

I kind of like Mike Rowe's outlook that you can have a completely ordinary job, make good money, have a good quality of life and be perfectly happy doing it. Chasing a specific dream is fun and rewarding, but it isn't without its price.

Overall, I encourage you to do it if you have looked into it. Given what you want to focus on now, it is probably a really good investment.
owequitit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2015, 10:17 PM   #31
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote


That's very true about being able to have an ordinary job and being happy doing it. My fiancee has that right now. She works for a company that installs phones and security systems for schools. She's a secretary, and she's fine with that. She's a damn good secretary, and she gets paid well for doing it (especially since her company is just a small local place, and not some big fancy business.) The only downside is that she's not going anywhere. She won't ever find another job as a secretary making what she makes now, doing similar work. She could go into the city and make good money, but she has no desire to make that daily commute, or to relocate to the city (and neither do I!)
I hope to be somewhere in between "chasing the dream" and just working a normal job. I don't much care what I do, as long as I can do it primarily during standard weekday business hours (occasional nights and weekends will work... just not regular.) I still want the opportunity to move up, but as long as I feel I have a goal to work toward, I'll be motivated.

A friend of mine started working as a temp for some fire security company. Just "a job", but she discovered that she loved the company, and found the work interesting. She worked her way up, and ended up making some pretty decent money. She decided to take the company up on their offer of tuition reimbursement, and earned both her Bachelor's and her Master's in Fire Safety, I believe. She worked herself into a very good position, and was able to move from NJ to Portland, OR... while keeping her job and being able to work remotely (or travel to various locations occasionally.) She even got a company car (a brand new Ford Fusion.)
I'm hoping I can find a situation like that. Find a company, discover that I really like the company, and I really like the work... then work my ass off and move up the ladder. Hopefully the MBA will allow me to do it in less time than she did (which was over the course of 8-10 years, I believe.)
I'm not expecting it, but 6 figures by the time I turn 45 would be peachy!



As for my tax records being enough to verify my employment... I wish. That wasn't even good enough for me to refinance my home (and I was looking to LOWER my payment by $200/mo!) Apparently my tax records weren't sufficient proof of income ( ) and the underwriter felt that I wouldn't be able to keep up with the new lower payment, so I had to stick with the current higher payment instead. Never missed a payment in the entire 12 years I've been here...
Maybe it would help more with a prospective employer... but it still doesn't really serve to support the claims made on my resume regarding my job functions. I could claim anything I want and nobody could verify it! It's all true... if anything, I'm underselling myself... but they don't know that (and a hiring manager worth his paycheck SHOULD be skeptical.)
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2015, 12:26 AM   #32
owequitit
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern AZ
Posts: 7,645
owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful
Send a message via AIM to owequitit
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevergote View Post


That's very true about being able to have an ordinary job and being happy doing it. My fiancee has that right now. She works for a company that installs phones and security systems for schools. She's a secretary, and she's fine with that. She's a damn good secretary, and she gets paid well for doing it (especially since her company is just a small local place, and not some big fancy business.) The only downside is that she's not going anywhere. She won't ever find another job as a secretary making what she makes now, doing similar work. She could go into the city and make good money, but she has no desire to make that daily commute, or to relocate to the city (and neither do I!)
I hope to be somewhere in between "chasing the dream" and just working a normal job. I don't much care what I do, as long as I can do it primarily during standard weekday business hours (occasional nights and weekends will work... just not regular.) I still want the opportunity to move up, but as long as I feel I have a goal to work toward, I'll be motivated.

A friend of mine started working as a temp for some fire security company. Just "a job", but she discovered that she loved the company, and found the work interesting. She worked her way up, and ended up making some pretty decent money. She decided to take the company up on their offer of tuition reimbursement, and earned both her Bachelor's and her Master's in Fire Safety, I believe. She worked herself into a very good position, and was able to move from NJ to Portland, OR... while keeping her job and being able to work remotely (or travel to various locations occasionally.) She even got a company car (a brand new Ford Fusion.)
I'm hoping I can find a situation like that. Find a company, discover that I really like the company, and I really like the work... then work my ass off and move up the ladder. Hopefully the MBA will allow me to do it in less time than she did (which was over the course of 8-10 years, I believe.)
I'm not expecting it, but 6 figures by the time I turn 45 would be peachy!



As for my tax records being enough to verify my employment... I wish. That wasn't even good enough for me to refinance my home (and I was looking to LOWER my payment by $200/mo!) Apparently my tax records weren't sufficient proof of income ( ) and the underwriter felt that I wouldn't be able to keep up with the new lower payment, so I had to stick with the current higher payment instead. Never missed a payment in the entire 12 years I've been here...
Maybe it would help more with a prospective employer... but it still doesn't really serve to support the claims made on my resume regarding my job functions. I could claim anything I want and nobody could verify it! It's all true... if anything, I'm underselling myself... but they don't know that (and a hiring manager worth his paycheck SHOULD be skeptical.)
Re-financing your house and trying to explain to an employer your job history are two totally different things. Depending on the lender, they don't necessarily employee the sharpest knives. I know a number of people who have tried to refinance their houses in either my industry, or the trucking industry. The problem is that a lot of these people have absolutely no idea what "per diem" is and why it is un-taxable and that it counts as a significant amount of additional income that is valid to apply toward the house payment.

But being able to explain what you did, and show proof that you were making money doing it is different. Plus, they will be able to determine fairly quickly whether you are lying. If they are worth their salt, they will be able to figure it out in a few short questions. I think that part will be just fine, especially given that there were a lot of "Deverinvestigation" type operations going on in that timeframe with the market.
owequitit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2015, 08:37 AM   #33
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
That is true.

Honestly, the hard part is simply getting an interview based on my resume. I've never had an interview that didn't result in a job offer.
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2015, 06:59 PM   #34
luckyflip
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Dallas.TX
Posts: 582
luckyflip is cool... so far.
Send a message via AIM to luckyflip
Hope all is well Deev and good luck on finding your dream career.
__________________
luckyflip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 02:45 PM   #35
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
Thank you, sir!

In contact with the school now. I'm accepted, awaiting the assessment of my undergrad transcripts to determine what prerequisites I still need to complete. With luck, at least 3 of the 4 will be covered by classes I took while earning my BA and AS. With more luck, I'll be able to begin graduate level classes this Fall, because the one prerequisite that I'm fairly certain I'll need to take isn't offered until the Winter session!
I'm hoping to be able to take 2 classes a session... maybe 3, if I can swing it (I asked the school how often people work full time and shoulder 3 classes...)

If I have to complete all 4 prerequisite classes in addition to the graduate courseload, I'm looking at 48 credit-hours (each class represents 3 credit hours.) If I can swing 3 classes a semester, I'll be done in a little over a year. If I can only do 2 at a time, then it'll take me 2 years. A fair investment of time, but not terrible. Not bad for $12,000!
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 08:07 PM   #36
owequitit
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern AZ
Posts: 7,645
owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful
Send a message via AIM to owequitit
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevergote View Post
Thank you, sir!

In contact with the school now. I'm accepted, awaiting the assessment of my undergrad transcripts to determine what prerequisites I still need to complete. With luck, at least 3 of the 4 will be covered by classes I took while earning my BA and AS. With more luck, I'll be able to begin graduate level classes this Fall, because the one prerequisite that I'm fairly certain I'll need to take isn't offered until the Winter session!
I'm hoping to be able to take 2 classes a session... maybe 3, if I can swing it (I asked the school how often people work full time and shoulder 3 classes...)

If I have to complete all 4 prerequisite classes in addition to the graduate courseload, I'm looking at 48 credit-hours (each class represents 3 credit hours.) If I can swing 3 classes a semester, I'll be done in a little over a year. If I can only do 2 at a time, then it'll take me 2 years. A fair investment of time, but not terrible. Not bad for $12,000!
The only thing I will mention as a caution, is that 6 hours at the graduate level really is full time. You work about twice as hard for each credit hour.
owequitit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 09:46 PM   #37
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
Yeah, that's what I've read. This school says that anything more than 9 hours requires administrative approval.

I'm expecting that I'll be limited to 2 classes at a time.
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 09:49 PM   #38
owequitit
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern AZ
Posts: 7,645
owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful owequitit is very helpful
Send a message via AIM to owequitit
Quote:
Originally Posted by deevergote View Post
Yeah, that's what I've read. This school says that anything more than 9 hours requires administrative approval.

I'm expecting that I'll be limited to 2 classes at a time.
Well, I was thinking to start at a "normal" full time level and then add if you can handle it. It makes it easier to stick to your plan, vs having to drop within a limited time frame and then adjusting to extend. It isn't the end of the world, but I just remember that 6 hours plus a job was pretty intensive. I didn't have a lot of free time.
owequitit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2015, 11:12 PM   #39
phatdoughnut
CB7tuner Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4,747
phatdoughnut is very helpful phatdoughnut is very helpful phatdoughnut is very helpful
Send a message via AIM to phatdoughnut
F it, just get a liberal arts degree and live off obama.
__________________
H22 Prelude VTEC 92-96 200 161 10.6:1 87 90 DOHC VTEC 2157 JDM

190.3whp 155 wtq - with bolt ons, and a dc header

ET=14.457 @ 94mph w/ 2.173 60Fter

phatdoughnut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2015, 09:22 AM   #40
deevergote
Don't call me dude.
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Not New York
Posts: 40,113
deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool... deevergote . You'll never be this cool...
Send a message via AIM to deevergote
Quote:
Originally Posted by owequitit View Post
Well, I was thinking to start at a "normal" full time level and then add if you can handle it. It makes it easier to stick to your plan, vs having to drop within a limited time frame and then adjusting to extend. It isn't the end of the world, but I just remember that 6 hours plus a job was pretty intensive. I didn't have a lot of free time.
That's true. And most likely what I'll do. I'm just feeling ambitious. I also don't know what sort of work I'll be doing, as I'm done with my foreclosure work. If I end up getting an unstressful job that leaves a good deal of free time, I may be able to swing 3 classes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phatdoughnut View Post
F it, just get a liberal arts degree and live off obama.
I would, but I'm a suburban straight white guy that isn't drowning in student loan debt. I can't check off any of the boxes in order to get gov't handouts. I can't even get a free Obamaphone!
__________________






deevergote is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.