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Old 12-11-2016, 06:19 PM   #21
Raf99
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Now i've been in cottages with such properties and I wouldn't want it any other way. My dream is to own a nice cottage on a lake and I'd rather it be older and squeaky
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Old 12-11-2016, 08:19 PM   #22
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I've never really been interested in Texas, though after visiting Dallas and Austin a couple years ago, I liked it far more than I thought I would! My brother in law lives outside of Dallas, and my wife has a good friend outside of Austin. I know a TON of Texas people from this site, too!

We're probably staying in NJ, though. It's expensive to live here (though not so bad down south where we are... near NYC is obscene! We're near Philly.) Still, we're close to everything without being in the middle of anything. In 1-2 hours (or less), I can be at the ocean, in the mountains, in NYC, in Philly, in Baltimore, in DC, in tax-free Delaware, in the remote pine barrens, in farm land, or in wealthy historic areas dating back to the birth of this country. This area really does have it all!
Try NYC !!!!!

600k for a 15' wide by 50' deep attached house on a block that has gunfire every other night

Not for me

214k for a place in NJ is not bad even if it is near NYC
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Old 12-11-2016, 09:29 PM   #23
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OMG, we've been through this, too, with the doors. We can't use anything pre-hung as the walls are way too thick, some of the doorways are narrower at the bottom, and/or there's a very slight slant to the wall. Several of ours have the skeleton key lock but the mechanism is either seized up from age or being painted. Some day I'll take them apart and try and get them working again, but that's definitely not high on my priority list!

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I have a feeling my house is from around 1920. That's exactly how mine is, too! Slats and plaster, odd-sized doors, skeleton key holes (never had a key... half the doors don't even line up with the latch anymore anyway.)
I dread having to replace a door. I hacked up my bedroom door one day because it wouldn't close. I regret that now, because it is solid wood, and a weird size. Now I have to find a way to patch up the jagged mess I made of the top of it when I filed it down!
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Old 12-12-2016, 04:42 AM   #24
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Ya, and plaster walls suck! haha. I've lived in houses where the windows were so old they were painted shut. And you left them that way because it provided good sealant from the weather
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Old 12-12-2016, 11:57 AM   #25
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My house is odd to say the least. No major issues, but since moving in I've had to do alot to seal it up and keep the heat in! Did blow in insulation in the attic, sealed up the crawl space door, fixed some exterior walls that didn't have insulation in them!! Just a bunch of hack work by the previous owners. Electrical is a nightmare, there's switches in odd places, the boxes aren't all lined up visually, and the wiring itself is janky as hell but I've inspected it and doesn't appear to be a fire hazard. Still have some more to fix like how the rear outside light switch is in the basement stairwell . Rooms are odd sizes, it used to be a cabin then was added onto so the new section has a basement while the old section is just a crawl space. it goes on and on. At least the roof doesn't leak! The house isn't really older than mid 60's but it's just hack work by several previous owners that needs to be remediated.
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Old 01-02-2017, 11:16 PM   #26
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Ya, and plaster walls suck! haha. I've lived in houses where the windows were so old they were painted shut. And you left them that way because it provided good sealant from the weather
Just bought a house 6 months ago, and mine are stained shut... House was built 1927, rebuilt late 80s.
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Old 01-07-2017, 05:31 AM   #27
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The house my mom just sold was like that! Built in 1994, and things were falling apart already when they bought it in 2001. Fixed windows leaking and popping out of their frames, nail pops everywhere, linoleum kitchen floor buckling in spots... It wasn't a cheap place, either. It was in a fairly well-off neighborhood, in a desirable lakefront community. They fixed it up really nice 2 years ago, just in time to sell it and move to Florida.


I agree about modern homes feeling like products. I mean, you can go into a 60s development and see cookie-cutter houses, but somehow they seem less mass-produced than new stuff. Perhaps because they've been lived in and personalized for decades, or perhaps because new stuff really is just crapped out as quickly and cheaply as possible!

I'm hoping we can find the sweet spot... a house that's old enough to be made well, and new enough not to be suffering from archaic design or in need of major renovation.


I have a feeling my house is from around 1920. That's exactly how mine is, too! Slats and plaster, odd-sized doors, skeleton key holes (never had a key... half the doors don't even line up with the latch anymore anyway.)
I dread having to replace a door. I hacked up my bedroom door one day because it wouldn't close. I regret that now, because it is solid wood, and a weird size. Now I have to find a way to patch up the jagged mess I made of the top of it when I filed it down!
Houses are ultimately machines. Things have lifespans.

Roofs are often about 10 years, plumbing about 30, and wiring depends on when it was built, how good it was, etc. Even foundations, etc required maintenance over time, and while it is frustrating, imagine that your house may have had all of that stuff replaced 3 or 4 times like a timing belt... Except maybe the wiring, which usually doesn't get replaced until the house is either remodeled or burns down.

If you own a house, you will definitely have to repair and fix it over time. The hope is that it appreciates more than the amount you put into it!
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Old 01-07-2017, 07:11 PM   #28
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I was never into houses like that but then my father at the time when I was living over there decided to fix up a couple of things in the house. For one we remodeled up the kitchen then did the basement.

The electrical's weren't a problem but we did manage to do the carpeting and delete the heating use for oil and go for central air. The oil to heat up the house was expensive as heck not to mention the roof-line needed to be insulated aswell as the siding needed to be replaced since it was aluminum heh made alot of money off that when we gave it to the scrapyard place.

Iv'e learned a great deal about houses and plumbing if the mechanics thing doesn't work out imma go straight into home-remodeling.
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Old 01-08-2017, 07:17 PM   #29
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Houses are ultimately machines. Things have lifespans.

Roofs are often about 10 years,
The heat near you must do a number on roofs, ones around here typically last 15-20 years, with some people stretching them even further as needed.
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:08 PM   #30
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The heat near you must do a number on roofs, ones around here typically last 15-20 years, with some people stretching them even further as needed.
The heat may play a role, but I think it is likely more due to frequently high wind speeds and torrential downpours.
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Old 02-08-2017, 11:19 PM   #31
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Mine was built in 1925, bought it 5 years ago. What a thread I can relate to!

It's a mission style home aka Spanish style with the flat roof, common around that time in California. Recently during heavy rain all day, a puddle of water formed in my basement and it got worse. I found out my roof drain dumps into a stand pipe that goes to the City's sanitary sewer. My sewer main had backed up somewhere near the sidewalk (where there's a clean out for viewing). I had a plumber out to snake the standpipe, since there's no snakeable cleanout in the yard. And you can't snake the clean out in the sidewalk. He wasn't able to break through so he couldn't charge me his $250 fee. But watching him I figured I could do it, and I found a 4" clean out just below my crawlspace in my middle bedroom (abs pipe that 2 toilets and showers dump into). I rented the 100 foot snake from somewhere, and snaked my sewer pipe all the way to the street. Cleared whatever was clogging it.

The projects and stuff to fix never ends. It's no wonder I haven't finished the CB7. But I like fixing shit and learning new shit. But how I will ever access the sewer pipe below the kitchen sink or even the main sewer pipe (cast iron) from below that side of the house is beyond me. Hope I never have to replace it there. Might have to break through the side of the house or something. No room in the crawlspace to get to it.

But, it's a beautiful house and only 2.5 miles from the office.
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