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EXT : Gummiegorillas Do it Nice or Do it Twice A/C Retrofit !!

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  • Accrdwgnguy
    replied
    I know it was very helpful to me, I sorted out my gf's 95 Accord AC system before last summer. New receiver/drier, and it charged up nice and has been ice cold since.

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  • 9tAkord
    replied
    It's that time of the year again. Pretty sure this will be a very usefull and informative thread to everybody

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  • esskater892
    replied
    CD5 compressor

    ok, so i got curious about what compressors would fit. after messing up the one i got at autozone and it seizing up on me i decided to try one from a 94 generation accord (CD5), I don't know the exact year car it came from, it was the next generation CD5 accord tho. It bolted right up, I switched the hose manifold that is on top of the compressor and put a new seal in it. this way my hoses would fit and not leak. the difference between the CD and the CB were the studs on the manifold. Anyways I also got new rubber hoses and replaced my expansion valve.

    let me back track a little

    I did take all the lines off and used ac flush the first time to make sure there was not any R12 residue in the system. I did this probably 2 years ago (haha). Then last summer tried to charge the system and was not so successful for a few reason, Used the OG rubber hose which was not made for R134, and I believe I did not add enough PAG oil to the system as I could not find how much the compressor needed. It was an EVERCO compressor from autozone. So I said screw it ill deal with the heat.

    back to current time.

    This year I said im tired of fogged up windows when it rains and the heat will be to uncomfortable to drive in. So I redid my AC system

    To use the CD5 compress the one wire that comes off the compressor does not match the wire harness for the CB7 so you will have to cut the CD5 compressor wire and use a butt connector to connect the CB7 compressor wire you cut so that it will plug into the CB7 wire harness.

    I pulled vacuum and use the 12 oz can and I believe its a 16 oz can of AC pro with UV leak detector. However I did not have a leak after pulling vacuum but I thought if there ever is going to be a leak this will make it easier to find. Using just thos 2 cans filled it up exactly to the right pressure and i have amazingly cold air, better than using a new compressor from autozone that was designed for our cars! or maybe I did something wrong the first time I don't know, either way I'm super happy with using a compressor already made for the R134 refrigerant!

    just wanted others to know that a CD5 compressor will bolt up to the CB7 and only a few things need to be changed.

    also if its not already been said, replace the rubber hoses if your doing the conversion and have not already because the R12's molecules are bigger than the R134 and the R134 will leak/sweat out of the older hoses.

    also I got the compressor from the slavage yard!!!!! been a few days and it still works, its also a denso one at that, I do recomend turning the clutch by hand to see how it moves, also I pulled it from a car that had a little bit of pressure in the likes still.

    Hope some of this information will help someone out, if not, then whatever haha.

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  • Accrdwgnguy
    replied
    So I attempted to do this on my gf's 95 Accord. Vacuumed down fine and didn't lose pressure. Proceeded to start filling and the high side pressure skyrocketed to over 400psi. Low side hit about 50psi before I shut everything down. Thinking there's a blockage somewhere, I didn't do a complete flush of the system.

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  • bobbycos
    replied
    i horsetraded and swapped around and should be in possession of about 18 lbs left of R12 in a 30lb tank

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  • esskater892
    replied
    i have a question about the charging. what is the pressure that you filled it up to?

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  • SEgirl
    replied
    In searching for info on compressors, I ran across this thread and realized that I never replied to this! AFAIK, the price did include that. I'm not sure if there was any R-12 left in the car, but that did include putting in the r-13.

    The compressor in themy other 93 SE is now officially dead, so I"m on the hunt for a replacement. It was retrofitted years ago, so at least I don't have to worry about that on this car.

    Originally posted by htownmike View Post
    Did that include the retrofit and flush all the old r-12 and putting in the r-134a? Some people quoted me like around $500

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  • htownmike
    replied
    Originally posted by SEgirl View Post
    I got this done to one my 93 SEs this past summer, and if IIRC, it cost +/-$300 at the dealership.
    Did that include the retrofit and flush all the old r-12 and putting in the r-134a? Some people quoted me like around $500

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  • SEgirl
    replied
    I got this done to one my 93 SEs this past summer, and if IIRC, it cost +/-$300 at the dealership.

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  • Xclusive1
    replied
    Bumping this thread cuz it was hella hot in Cali today. I need to do this this summer!!

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  • xkjnboix
    replied
    i thought this would be a pretty cool addition to the DIY. very inexpensive ( 1-2$ /6ft ), mass zipties at harbor freight or walmart like 5$.

    there has been some applications where no noticeable difference is discovered. if that were the case then just remove it and recycle the material for something else. On a side note, I used some of that cheap foam stuff for the soft lines in front of my heat shield on my old DA9 and it did not catch on fire or melt. Im in Louisiana where during the summer it gets to 90-100 degrees daily.

    http://www.yarisworld.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19530

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  • esskater892
    replied
    did i read right where one could use a 94-97 accord compressor? and does that already use the r134a stuff? would make cleaning the compressor step easier cause then you can just go to a jy and hope it works and just clean the lines out.

    also wanna make sure i read right that the es r12 can be used so one wouldnt have to clean the lines n stuff?

    either way i need to pull the lines and check for leaks and clean stuff up.

    well i guess i dont have to pull the lines to check for leaks but i want to.

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  • 10thAnnivCB7
    replied
    My stock one is still cold but this is nice for when when I would want to convert. Would all that fit in there with an h22 swap ?

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  • motobmx105
    replied
    I found this a long time ago and finally did it today and after replacing all O rings and 2 trips to the junk yard once for a new hose and another for a compressor since mine seized once the clutched enauged she's all charged and nice and cold!!!!! Finally after having this car for about 7 years the a/c works! Thanks for an awesome DIY!

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  • wildBill83
    replied
    I'm following this DIY today, my system has been converted to R134a and my system holds a vacuum but the clutch is bad on my old compressor, so new compressor and drier go in today, the flush and o-ring change is just a precaution. I got another Denso compressor from the junk yard for $50 with a 6 month warranty. (TEST CLUTCH WITH 9V BATTERY BEFORE LEAVING THE YARD!)

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