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Raf99 : 1993 Accord EX

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    I've always wanted a cleaner engine bay. Weld in the holes, shave down the bumps, clean the engine up and make it shine. You know.....

    But I've never removed an engine before. I don't know how to weld. And I've never painted an engine bay. Being a form of perfectionist I want it done right, which means I have to do it myself.

    Welding........ oh boy. No clue where to start. But yes, I think I'm going down this path as soon as I get the interior finished.

    Comment


      That's some of the best kind of excitement.

      Removing the engine is not that difficult. It just takes time and you should label everything your first time.

      As for welding and painting, I know the feeling. I'm about to buy a welder after A LOT of research and watching many many hours of how-to/review videos. Fortunately a friend of mine has some experience with painting/body work, so I've a got little help with that. Not sure if I'm going to go through with the engine bay since I have to practice welding first. I have to get this car done already.

      Comment


        Originally posted by Tishock View Post
        That's some of the best kind of excitement.

        Removing the engine is not that difficult. It just takes time and you should label everything your first time.

        As for welding and painting, I know the feeling. I'm about to buy a welder after A LOT of research and watching many many hours of how-to/review videos. Fortunately a friend of mine has some experience with painting/body work, so I've a got little help with that. Not sure if I'm going to go through with the engine bay since I have to practice welding first. I have to get this car done already.
        Hear that. I went and looked at welders and had no clue what i was looking at. There were mini, small, medium, large, and stuff I had noooo idea about. Would be a shame to go spend $300+ on a welding kit and then someone says "ohhh, ya. Umm... you should of gotten this instead"

        But yet i have others telling me that welding is easy on hondas because the metal is so thin. But for holes that are the size of a quarter, don't I need to find metal to weld in there? How large can the holes be for welding (or how small do they have to be).......

        Comment


          You can almost always add metal when welding. But I would do what odbweldingworks(the guy that did the v6 swap here) did and weld a plate over the large holes.

          I assume you would want to do MIG welding?

          YouTube Clicky!!

          Comment


            Originally posted by sonikaccord View Post
            You can almost always add metal when welding. But I would do what odbweldingworks(the guy that did the v6 swap here) did and weld a plate over the large holes.

            I assume you would want to do MIG welding?
            You are talking greek already I "think" I want mig welding.
            I've seen people weld a plate over where the battery goes and the same with the other side. But not a huge fan of having space between the metal for moisture and junk to collect.

            But ya, i was going to get some version of this, probably the $299 one. But there are many sizes. I'm assuming the bigger the unit the thicker the metal / more power it has. Any suggestions from that page ?

            Comment


              A small flux core welder like the one you are looking at is what I am using to learn how to weld on. Like everything else it's about the prep work to get good results. I currently wouldn't trust my welding for anything structural but it is good enough for welding back together exhaust. I have laid a few good beads but i have put alot more bubble gum down. It seems the better welds come from running the wire as fast as you can lay it down.
              EDIT: if you can't weld pretty you better learn to run a grinder.
              CB7TUNER.com
              Educating each other one car at a time.

              Comment


                Lookin Good

                Ive been gone for a while but I had to tell you your car is amazing. You have done an excellent job on it.
                Procrastination is a THIEF of time!!

                MY MRT

                http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=203992

                My First CB7

                http://www.cardomain.com/ride/705233/1990-honda-accord/


                Comment


                  MIG is all you need, along with a copper dolly. You use the copper dolly as a backing and fill the holes using the MIG welder. Mild steel wire will not fuse to copper. I am not a fan of layering pieces of steel. Much cleaner and better in the long run to take the time and cut out templates and make the proper sized cutouts.

                  Having a gas purge and running the thinnest gauge wire for your machine is the key for nice welds on this thin sheet metal using a MIG. TIG is a much cleaner process but much more money up front and more practice.

                  All this was done using a Lincoln 140 MIG pac (110v) and FLUX core wire (No gas). It is a bit rough in spots, but a little skim of filler and some sanding ang it will all be good.



                  I have since moved up to a the 180 MIG (220v) and am working on getting my first TIG setup.
                  MR Thread
                  GhostAccord 2.4L Blog

                  by Chappy, on Flickr

                  Comment


                    Originally posted by cb9love View Post
                    A small flux core welder like the one you are looking at is what I am using to learn how to weld on. Like everything else it's about the prep work to get good results. I currently wouldn't trust my welding for anything structural but it is good enough for welding back together exhaust. I have laid a few good beads but i have put alot more bubble gum down. It seems the better welds come from running the wire as fast as you can lay it down.
                    EDIT: if you can't weld pretty you better learn to run a grinder.
                    bubble gum is the ....... bead?

                    Originally posted by dahubby View Post
                    Ive been gone for a while but I had to tell you your car is amazing. You have done an excellent job on it.
                    Thanks man! I remember your MRT, I love the silver rims over the gold ones btw.

                    Originally posted by GhostAccord View Post
                    MIG is all you need, along with a copper dolly. You use the copper dolly as a backing and fill the holes using the MIG welder. Mild steel wire will not fuse to copper. I am not a fan of layering pieces of steel. Much cleaner and better in the long run to take the time and cut out templates and make the proper sized cutouts.

                    Having a gas purge and running the thinnest gauge wire for your machine is the key for nice welds on this thin sheet metal using a MIG. TIG is a much cleaner process but much more money up front and more practice.

                    All this was done using a Lincoln 140 MIG pac (110v) and FLUX core wire (No gas). It is a bit rough in spots, but a little skim of filler and some sanding ang it will all be good.

                    I have since moved up to a the 180 MIG (220v) and am working on getting my first TIG setup.
                    Dear jesus of god. But at least i have an idea of what i need now! ! OK....... why move up to the 180? What was wrong with the 140?

                    Comment


                      getting there, starting to think the OEM black rug on the bottom needs to go and be replaced with the same black material as the rest.

                      Last edited by Raf99; 08-05-2018, 08:14 PM.

                      Comment


                        Originally posted by Raf99 View Post
                        bubble gum is the ....... bead?

                        waded up bubble gum is what it looks like when you don't get good penetration.
                        so yes the bead or lack there of.
                        CB7TUNER.com
                        Educating each other one car at a time.

                        Comment


                          Originally posted by Raf99 View Post
                          Dear jesus of god. But at least i have an idea of what i need now! ! OK....... why move up to the 180? What was wrong with the 140?
                          The 180 is 220v and along with that added power also comes finer adjutments. it is capable of doing a lot more from thin to thicker metals. With the larger range it makes dialing in your welds a lot easier.
                          MR Thread
                          GhostAccord 2.4L Blog

                          by Chappy, on Flickr

                          Comment


                            Don't forget we also have a welding and fabrication forum...it's rarely used nowadays.
                            http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/forumdisplay.php?f=105

                            YouTube Clicky!!

                            Comment


                              Originally posted by sonikaccord View Post
                              Don't forget we also have a welding and fabrication forum...it's rarely used nowadays.
                              http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/forumdisplay.php?f=105
                              thanks. i started reading it.

                              Hey Ghost, where did you get the metal to fill in the engine bay holes? I imagine it would have to be identical metal? (thickness, type, etc.)

                              Comment


                                Canadian Tire. From what I remember the sheet metal they sell is the same thickness. I don't know the exact thickness right off hand. You might be able to find it cheaper at Princess Auto or another metal supplier. It is mild steel so as long as the thickness is similar you should be good to go.

                                Try and make sure that it is not galvanized. Welding galvanized materials is very hard on you. It gives off a toxic gas that causes zinc fume fever. If you do need to weld galvanized materials. Make sure to do it outside or in a well ventilated area while wearing an appropriately filtered mask. I wear a 3M half mask with the flexible pancake filters as it fits under my welding shield.

                                No mater what materials you are welding always make sure to remove any imperfections and coatings from them prior to fitting and welding them.
                                MR Thread
                                GhostAccord 2.4L Blog

                                by Chappy, on Flickr

                                Comment

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